Lev Manovich: How to see 300 million images? Exploring large cultural data to unlearn what we know

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Lev Manovich is the author of Software Takes Command (Bloomsbury Academic, 2013), Soft Cinema: Navigating the Database (The MIT Press, 2005), and The Language of New Media (The MIT Press, 2001) which was described as “the most suggestive and broad ranging media history since Marshall McLuhan.” Manovich is a Professor at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and a Director of the Software Studies Initiative that works on the analysis and visualization of big cultural data. In 2013 he appeared on the List of 25 People Shaping the Future of Design.

His website is manovich.net.

November 7, 2014; 3 PM in Russell House, 350 High Street.

This talk is sponsored by the Digital and Computational Knowledge Initiative 

Christopher Weaver: The Informed Entrepreneur: Applying Lessons of Experience and Science to Improve Startup Success

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Biography: Chris Weaver teaches in Materials Science and Engineering and Comparative Media Studies/Writing. He received his S.M. from MIT and was the initial Daltry scholar at Wesleyan University, where he earned dual master’s degrees in Japanese and Computer Science and a CAS Doctoral Degree in Japanese Ethnomusicology and Physics. The former Director of Technology Forecasting for ABC and Chief Engineer to the Subcommittee on Communications to the US Congress, he founded Bethesda Softworks, a leading software company that is credited with the development of physics-based sports simulation and creating the original John Madden Football for Electronic Arts as well as the Elder Scrolls role-playing series. He has numerous patents in interactive media, security, broadband and telecommunications engineering. A former member of the Architecture Machine Group and Fellow of the Research Program on Communications Policy, he is currently a Board Member of the Communications Technology Roadmap Group in the Microphotonics Center at MIT.

Talk: There is more to entrepreneurship than luck. Learn some of the science behind key entrepreneurial principles and test your knowledge in the process. Christopher Weaver (MALS ‘76/CAS ‘77) is the Founder of Bethesda Softworks, creators of Fallout 3 and The Elder Scrolls series. He will discuss the building of one of the largest private games companies in the world, and will share some of the lessons he learned along the way.

November 19, 2014 at 4:15 PM in Usdan 108

Sponsored by DaCKI, The Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship, and the College of Integrative Sciences

 

Stephen Berry, Digital Humanities

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Stephen Berry is Gregory Professor of the Civil War Era in the Department of History at the University of Georgia and the author or editor of four books on America in the mid-19th century, including House of Abraham: Lincoln and the Todds, A Family Divided by War. Berry is co-director, with Claudio Saunt, of both the Center for Virtual History and the Digital Humanities Initiative on the UGA campus. A Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians, Berry’s work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mellon Foundation, and the American Council of Learned Societies.

WORKSHOP: “The Digital Humanities at A(nother) Crossroads.” In an informal brown-bag setting historian Stephen Berry, Co-Director of the University of Georgia’s Digital Humanities Initiative, will discuss the major trends and players in digital humanities with an emphasis on how information technologies are reshaping, but not revolutionizing, humanities research and teaching. October 22nd at noon, in Usdan 108

TALK: “CSI Dixie: Death Investigation and the Civil War Era South.” Come learn what the morgue can tell us about life and death in the nineteenth-century South. Based on a deep reading of the extant coroners’ inquests for the state of South Carolina, Berry provides glimpses into the sad intimacies inherent in the varied ways people go out of the world. “No society should be judged solely from its morgue,” Berry concludes, “but every society has to answer for its morgue.” October 22nd at 4:15pm, in Wyllys 112

 

Gary King: Reverse Engineering Chinese Censorship

King is one of the most innovative and influential social science methodologists, much of his work probing the challenges and building solutions for both quantitative and qualitative analysis. He has pioneered research using automated textual analysis, health care evaluation, voting behaviours, international conflict, and the study of human mortality, to name just some fields in which he’s applied his methods.

King talks about “Reverse Engineering Chinese Censorship,” a recent collaborative investigation into the goals, scope, and effects of censorship by the Chinese government, an excellent exposition both of the impressive scope of big data analysis and its potential relevance to contemporary social and political understanding.

April Glaser: NSA Spying, Digital Privacy, and Your Rights Online

The U.S. government, with assistance from major telecommunications carriers, has engaged in a massive illegal dragnet surveillance of domestic communications and communications records of millions of ordinary Americans and people all over the world. Since this was first reported by the press and discovered by the public in late 2005, EFF has been at the forefront of the effort to stop illegal activities and bring government surveillance programs back within the law and the Constitution.

Glaser talks about two cases in which EFF is suing the NSA for violating the First and Fourth Amendment rights of their clients. She considers some of the spying programs that have been revealed since Edward Snowden began to disclose details about government spying last summer. Glaser discusses what is happening in Congress and the White House in response to the ongoing revelations of mass government surveillance. She provides an overview of digital rights activism mounting worldwide against mass surveillance and talk about how to engage in the growing movement to protect our rights in the digital age.

Ryan Cordell: Viral Textuality: Uncovering Reprinting Networks In 19th Century Newspapers

Ryan Cordell, Assistant Professor of English, at Northeastern University has routinely contributed to thinking on digital matters in research and in the undergraduate curriculum as you can see from his writing for the Chronicle of Higher Education among other venues.

The title of his talk is “Viral Textuality: Uncovering Reprinting Networks in Nineteenth-Century Newspapers.” The project has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities and is described here: http://viraltexts.org.

Cordell’s research reflects the best possibilities in the digital humanities. He writes literary history. He collaborates to do so, with computer scientists among others, and he’s revealing new phenomena with old methods and new.

Alongside traditional means of interpretation and contextualization, Cordell takes big data—newspapers for instance—and applies the latest text mining and network analysis to trace key parts of nineteenth century US culture, as they went viral via contemporary social media.

Kim Diver and Phil Stern: Geospatial Data Visualization and Analysis using GPS

Digital and Computational Knowledge Initiative – Philip Stern Workshop. The focus will be on how tools like GIS (Geographic Information Systems) among others can help us to analyze and visualize complex data, whether derived from texts or physical spaces. Presenters: Phil Stern (Assistant Professor of History at Duke University, and a graduate of the Wesleyan class of 1997) and Kim Diver (Visiting Assistant Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences at Wesleyan University).

“NSA Spying, Digital Privacy, and Your Rights Online” with April Glaser

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DaCKI/ATTLaS Speaker Series 

NSA Spying, Digital Privacy, and Your Rights Online

APRIL GLASER

Staff Activist, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) 

TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014, 7 P.M. 

Downey House, Room 113 

The U.S. government, with assistance from major telecommunications carriers, has engaged in a massive illegal dragnet surveillance of domestic communications and communications records of millions of ordinary Americans and people all over the world. Since this was first reported by the press and discovered by the public in late 2005, EFF has been at the forefront of the effort to stop illegal activities and bring government surveillance programs back within the law and the Constitution.

Glaser will talk about two cases in which EFF is suing the NSA for violating the First and Fourth Amendment rights of their clients. She also will consider some of the spying programs that have been revealed since Edward Snowden began to disclose details about government spying last summer. Glaser will discuss what is happening in Congress and the White House in response to the ongoing revelations of mass government surveillance. She will provide an overview of digital rights activism mounting worldwide against mass surveillance and talk about how to engage in the growing movement to protect our rights in the digital age.

New Ways to Map and Be Mapped with Diana Sinton

UVL14157_SintonPosterMapping space and place has become a pervasive and popular activity in society today, driven by the ubiquity of location-based goods and services as well as our growing ability to be front and center in our own maps. Geospatial data enables participatory communicating for scholars and citizens alike, and is creating innovative ways to collaborate in the classroom. Find out why maps, mapping, and spatial perspectives are fundamental to how we teach, learn, and think in our daily lives and the world around us.

seminar: New Ways to Map and Be Mapped

presenter: Diana Sinton

location: Downey House Lounge

date: Thursday April 3

time: 4:15 pm

Diana S. Sinton is one of the most influential proponents of GIS and spatial literacy in the liberal arts. She is currently the Executive Director of the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS), and an adjunct associate professor at Cornell University. She recently wrote The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinking (NCGE, 2013). She worked previously for the University of Redlands and the National Institute for Technology & Liberal Education (NITLE). Her interests include spatial literacy and the use of geospatial technologies in higher education. You can find more of her ideas at dianamaps.com and teachGIS.org.

This event is sponsored and supported by DaCKI, ATTLaS, and an Allbrittion Center for the Study of Public Life Collaborative Grant.

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