Maps, Networks, and Art Markets: Doing Digital Art History

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Monday, March 30th, 2015, at 4:15pm in Usdan 108.

A talk with Pamela Fletcher, Professor of Art History and Co-Director of the Digital and Computational Studies Initiative, Bowdoin College.

How and why did galleries run by dealers become the standard way to sell art? Professor Fletcher considers the invention of the commercial art gallery in London in the 19th century and uses her work on a digital map of London’s galleries to explore how digital and computational methods can help us ask and answer scholarly questions.

Professor Fletcher is the author of Narrating Modernity: The British Problem Picture 1895–1914 and the co-editor (with Anne Helmreich) of The Rise of the Modern Art Market in London 1850–1939. Together with David Israel, she created The London Gallery Project, an interactive digital map of London’s 19th-century art market. She is currently writing a book on the mid-Victorian painting of modern life, portions of which have appeared in the Oxford Art Journal, Victorian Studies, and Nineteenth-Century Contexts.

Thomas Uses CT Scans, Computer-Aided Visualizations to Study and Teach Microfossils

Ellen Thomas at Wesleyan University.

Ellen Thomas, Research Professor of Earth and Environmental Studies, is featured on the News @ Wesleyan blog.

“Up until recently, Thomas taught students about microfossils through microscope studies and by showing text book illustrations and images embedded in slide presentations. But with support from the National Science Foundation, Thomas and her peers were able to use cutting-edge technology to create high-resolution images and 3-D models of more than 40 microfossils in the phyla Foraminifera and Ostracoda.”

Read the full article here.